Twenty Six Year Old Adopts 21 African Children

by Lauren on July 13, 2010 · 0 comments

in People

Amanda Dye is just like any other 26 year old except for the fact that she is the legal guardian for twenty-one children… in Africa.

Amanda and some of the African children she has adopted. Amanda writes: "Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, loving somebody deeply gives you courage."

She didn’t intend to do anything so dramatic when she took a trip three years ago to teach English in Zambia. Once she saw the abundance of orphaned children on the streets though, she knew her life would be different.

I knew that I would never be okay with myself if I didn’t try to do something,” Amanda said.

After seeing the needs of the vulnerable children in Africa, she returned home to the United States to complete her college degree and work multiple jobs to raise money. In 2007, she started the orphanage, Energy of Hope, with a team of seven other individuals. She hopes to help the children, ages five to 16, escape poverty and become positive role models in their society.

Now local children can contribute to this work. Through “Summer Challenge for Local Kids,” children create projects to raise funds for the orphans in Africa. Projects might include lemonade stands, bake sales, dog walking or other grassroots efforts.

If you’re interested in participating, contact Amanda at info@energyofhope.org. Send contributions to Energy of Hope, PO Box 372 Liberty, MO 64069. Energy of Hope is a 501(c)3 non-profit so all donations are tax deductible. Awards will be given to the most creative projects. Last year, the winners and their projects were profiled on Fox 4 News in Kansas City.

Energy of Hope is also sponsoring a photography contest and provides educational materials for school teachers. Details are on the website.

Amanda writes: “Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, loving somebody deeply gives you courage.”

Amanda Dye must love deeply because she is one gutsy gal.

Share

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post:

Thesis Theme for WordPress:  Options Galore and a Helpful Support Community